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Muckleston Family History Group

researching all references to the surnames Muckleston, Mucklestone, Muckelston and Mackleston please get in touch via the contact us page with any additional information or to correct any errors.

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Bedfordshire Branch Tree
London Tree A
Mackleston Tree
Muckelston Tree
Wills
Continued

135.ROWLAND17 MUCKLESTON (RICHARD JEFFREYS16, JOHN15, EDWARD14, ROWLAND13, EDWARD12, ROWLAND11, EDWARD10, JOHN9, EDWARD8, HUGH7, THOMAS6, WILLIAM5, THOMAS4, WILLIAM3, ROGER2DE MUCCLESTON, HOESKYN1) was born 28 Apr 1828 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire.He married HANNAH ROGERS 30 Mar 1852 in St John, Thanet, Kent., daughter of WILLIAM GRIMWOOD ROGERS.She was born Abt. 1830.

Notes for ROWLAND MUCKLESTON:

Shoe Manufacturer of London

Sworn Burgess of Shrewsbury 1851

In Shrewsbury School Register 1798 - 1898

Entrance between June and December 1841 Rowland Muckleston

Shoe Manufacturer of Southwark London

Marriage certificate available. He was a batchelor at the time of marriage.

Rowland is a common family name, and most of us can claim a Rowland Muckleston for an ancestor, but it appears that they did like to distinguish themselves as much as possible.

This Rowland was born on April 28th 1828 in Shrewsbury, the son of Richard Jeffries Muckleston and his wife Jane. His father was well known in Shrewsbury being descended from a family with connections to the town for hundreds of years and he could trace his own ancestry back to the early 14th century. Richard took up a prominent position as a town councillor and was a Burgess from 1819, by trade he was a shoe manufacturer and dyer and his business prospered.

Rowland was one of six children, three boys and three girls, he was the youngest son. His two brothers however, died as infants as did his youngest sister, it was therefore down to Rowland as his fathers heir to continue his trade.

He attended the Shrewsbury school in 1841 and by 1851 had followed in his fathers footsteps and become a Burgess of Shrewsbury. In 1852 he was recorded as a Shoe Manufacturer of Southwark in London, whether it was his decision to start the business in London or his fathers it is not clear. He married Hannah Rogers the daughter of a Tailor in Kent in 1852 and all seemed settled.

The business clearly struggled for in 1856 the Times included the following in a list of Bankruptcies…….

22nd November 1856: Bankruptcies

Rowland Muckleston, Hackney Road Crescent, Wholesale Boot Manufacturer, Dec 2nd at 2 O'clock, Jan 6th at 12 O'clock at the court of Bankruptcy. Solicitor Mr Storey, Great JamesStreet, Bedford Row. Official Assignee Mr Edwards, Sambrook Court, Basinghall Street.

3rd December 1856 - In Re: R Muckleston

The bankrupt was a boot and shoemaker of Hackney Road crescent. Assignees were now chosen the debts and liabilities are said to be about £13,000

A large amount of debt indeed. Things clearly worsened as we find Rowland before the Recorder in the Central Criminal Court in December 1860. The Times newspaper covered the trial and here follows its account…

17th September 1860

As the court was about to rise, Mr Rowland Mucklestone, a gentlemanly-looking man, about 40 years of age, described as a merchant, and who had just been apprehended on a warrant, was charged, under the Fraudulent Trustees Act, with appropriating to his own use the proceeds of a cheque for £94 10s., entrusted to him for a specific purpose. It may be desirable to state that this section of the statute under which the proceeding before the court was instituted enacts that if any person, being a bailee of any property, shall fraudulently or convert it to his own use he shall be deemed guilty of larceny. Mr Gammon conducted the complaints case.

28th September 1860

MANSION HOUSE - Mr Rowland Mucklestone, a merchant of Lime Street, underwent a final examination before Alderman Sir Robert Carden on a charge preferred under the Fraudulent Trustees Act, of appropriating to his own use the proceeds of a cheque for £94 10s., entrusted to him for a specific purpose. Mr. Gammon one of the Under-Sheriffs, again attended to prefer the charge.

The evidence previously given went to show that in July last Mr W Onion, a carriage trimming manufacturer in Drury Lane, authorized the prisoner, who was then in his service as a town traveller, to procure for him an advance of money upon some velvets worth about £150. The prisoner agreed to do so, and a few days afterwards he agreed a loan of £95 for a month from Messers Werner and Falck, merchants of St Bury Court, St Mary Axe, £90 of which he handed over to Mr Onion, leaving him to understand that was all he had raised, and the velvets were deposited with them by way of security. Early in August just before the month had expired, the prisoner applied to Mr Onion for money to repay the advance, and that gentleman gave him a cheque on his bankers for £94 10s., with which to pay the principle and interest and redeem the goods. But instead of applying the proceeds of that cheque in redemption of the velvets, the prisoner was proved to have appropriated them to his won use, and the complainant could neither obtain his money back nor his goods. Subjoined in additional evidence adduced yesterday.

Mr W Spelman a clerk in the Union Bank of London (Temple Bar Branch), deposed that Mr Onion, the complainant, kept an account there and that his cheque for £94 10s was paid on the 6th August in one £50 note numbered 13262, three £10 notes, two fives and £4 10s in gold.

It was proved by Mr Philip Beyfus, a cabinet maker at 91, City Road, that the prisoner, whom he knew, went there on the 6th August and paid him £69 in notes and gold for some furniture which had been supplied to him in March and April last. Mr Beyfus did not know the numbers of the notes, but he paid the money with other sums into the Union Bank the following day. A clerk from the establishment proved that the sum paid into the bank to the credit of Mr Beyfus was £173 12s and that it included the £50 note, two of the £10 note and one of the £5 notes which had been paid at the Temple Bar branch of the bank to the prisoner in exchange for the cheque of £94 10s given him by the complainant.

The prisoner expressed an earnest wish to be remanded for another week, to afford him an opportunity to produce evidence to controvert that adduced in support of the charge, which he said he had hopes of being able to do.

Sir R Carden reminded him that he had already been remanded three times, adding, that I such evidence as he had indicated had been forthcoming, he already had opportunities of producing it. He (Sir R Carden) had made up his mind to send him before a jury, unable as he was to resist the evidence which had been given against him, and, that being so, the prisoner could produce the witnesses to whom he referred on his trial.

The prisoner, finding he was about to be committed for trial, the Alderman refusing to entertain an application to accept bail.

28th November 1860 - Criminal Trial

OLD COURT - before the Recorder. Rowland Mucklestone, 32, a respectable looking man, described in the calendar as an agent, was indicted for feloniously appropriating to his own use a cheque for £94 10s that had been entrusted to him for a specific purpose, as a bailee.

Mr Sleigh was counsel for the prosecution, Mr Metcalf was counsel for the prisoner.

The facts of the case appeared to be of somewhat complicated character, and the nature of the charge will be more intelligible if the more material points are given in the nature of a narrative. The prosecutor was a Mr William Onion, who carries on the business of a carriage trimming manufacturer in Drury Lane, and it appeared that he became acquainted with the prisoner in June last, and shortly afterwards he entered his service as clerk and traveller upon a salary and commission, but he remained only a very short time in his service, although they still seemed to be on friendly terms. In the beginning of July the prosecutor wanted some money for a temporary purpose, and he applied to the prisoner to know whether he could procure him an advance on some carriage velvets. A day or so after this the prisoner told him he could do so, and requested him to send the velvets to the offices of Messers Werner and Falck upon the velvets, and he had also said that the loan was to be for one month, and he had given a promissory note as collateral security. The prosecutor asked if he could not get a larger advance, and the prisoner said he would try, and on the following day he told the prosecutor that they would not lend more than £90. The promissory note became due on 9th August, and on the 6th the prosecutor gave the prisoner a cheque for £94 10s, £90 of that sum being to repay money borrowed and £4 10s for interest for one month, which it seems was the terms on which the money was advanced, and the prosecutor at the same time directed him to get the cheque cashed and to take the money to Messers Werner and Co and clear the velvets, but he wished them to hold the goods for a short time to his order, as he did not wish them to be brought again into stock, after having pawned them. He saw the prisoner the same day and he then said he had been to Messers Werners offices and that none of the firm were at home, but that he had left the money with a clerk and that it was alright. A short time after this the prosecutor discovered that the money had not been paid to Messers Werners and he also ascertained that, of his only having obtained £90 from these gentlemen he had in point of fact, the sum really advanced had been £100 and that £5 was deducted in the first instance for interest for one month, and that a cheque for £95 was given to the prisoner, out of the proceeds of which cheque he only gave the prosecutor £90 so that he had thus obtained £5 at the commencement of the transaction. It turned out that he afterwards appropriated to his own use the whole of the proceeds of the cheque for £94 10s that was given to him by the prosecutor to redeem the velvets on the 6th of August.

The prosecutor was subject to a very searching cross examination by Mr Metcalfe with regard to the nature of a variety of transactions between the prisoner and prosecutor, and he admitted that at one time he had given the prisoner the authority to sell the velvets if he could get a customer for cash or bills that he should approve. He also said that he did not obtain a warrant against him until some time after he discovered how the cheque had been disposed of, and that after the warrant had been placed in the hands of Haydon, the city detective officer, he requested him not to execute it, but to hold it over for a short time, and the reason for this it appeared was that he was having some negotiation with the prisoner and his friends, with the object of the money being repaid to him, and there seemed to be very little doubt that, if the prosecutor had received his money, no criminal charge would have been preferred.

Mr Metcalfe addressed the jury at some length, on behalf of the prisoner, and he observed upon the peculiar nature of the transaction between the prisoner and the prosecutor, and contended that the present charge was merely an after thought, and that the prosecutor had evidently only treated the matter as one of debt, and upon these ground he called upon the jury to acquit the prisoner.

The recorder having summed up the evidence, the jury, after a short deliberation, retuned a verdict of Guilty, but recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of the nature of the transaction that had taken place between him and the prosecutor.

Judgement was respite upon a technical made by Mr Metcalfe as to whether, under the circumstances, the prisoner was a bailee of the cheque within the meaning under the Act of Parliament.

1st December 1860 - Criminal Trials.

OLD COURT - Rowland Muckleston, 32, who was convicted on Tuesday of unlawfully misappropriating a cheque for £94 10s that had been entrusted to him for a specific purpose, was brought up on Thursday to receive judgement.

The prisoner when he was called up assured the court though that undoubtedly he had spent the proceeds of the cheque, he had no intention to defraud the prosecutor.

The Recorder said it was idle for him to say that he had no intention to defraud when it was proved that he had made use of the whole amount of the cheque to pay his own debts, and the prosecutor had to pay the money a second time. The jury had however, recommended mercy on account of the nature of the transactions that had taken place between him and the prosecutor, and, as he had already been three months in custody, he should only sentence him to be further imprisoned for a further six months.

His mother had died many years earlier but at the time of his trial his father was still alive and living in London, however, whether it was the sadness of seeing his only surviving son go to prison, or simply old age (he was 65), Richard Jeffries Muckleston, that man from a proud long lived family, did not live to see him son complete his prison sentence, dying earlier the next year, he left no will so it is assumed that Rowland and his two surviving married sisters inherited.

Rowland was probably in far better circumstances financially when he left prison, however from this point on there is no trace of Rowland and his wife Hannah, there are no deaths recorded of a Rowland or Hannah Muckleston in England or Wales. I suspect they either went abroad to start a new life, or simply changed their name to one less obvious and started afresh.

Could he have gone to america see Rowland W Muckleston who served in the US Navy

More About ROWLAND MUCKLESTON:

Baptism: 29 Apr 1828, St Alkmunds Shrewsbury Shropshire

Burgess: 1851, Shrewsbury

Education: Bet. Jun - Dec 1841, Shrewsbury School

Occupation: 1852, Shoe Manufacturer of Southwark London

Notes for HANNAH ROGERS:

Living at the White Hart Hotel at the time of her marriage.

Child of ROWLAND MUCKLESTON and HANNAH ROGERS is:

i.ROWLAND ERNEST18 MUCKLESTON, b. 17 Dec 1856, 5, Lower Phillimore Place, Kensington; d. 1857, Kensington London.

136.ELIZABETH17 MUCKLESTON (RICHARD JEFFREYS16, JOHN15, EDWARD14, ROWLAND13, EDWARD12, ROWLAND11, EDWARD10, JOHN9, EDWARD8, HUGH7, THOMAS6, WILLIAM5, THOMAS4, WILLIAM3, ROGER2DE MUCCLESTON, HOESKYN1) was born 09 Apr 1830 in St. Alkmund's, Shrewsbury.She married ALFRED REEVES WILD 07 Jun 1860 in Old Church St Pancras London, son of HENRY WILD.He was born Abt. 1829 in St Pancras Middx, and died Bef. 1871.

Notes for ELIZABETH MUCKLESTON:

1841 census

is this her - have yet to find the rest of her family on this census.

HO107/913/22

School, Bristol Road, Church Stretton, Shropshire

Teachers and pupils listedwhich includes

Elizabeth Muckleston11PupilYes

(pupils aged 7 to 14)

1851 census

HO107/1992/451/1

1 Pride Hill, Shrewsbury

Richard J Muckleston MarrHead54 Town Councillor and Shoe Manufacturer Shrewsbury

employing 100 men.

ElizabethMuckleston MarrWife52Shrewsbury

Margaret J Muckleston Unmarr Dau27Shrewsbury

Elizabeth Muckleston UnmarrDau20Shrewsbury

Samuel R Muckleston Unmarried Nephew 3Shrewsbury

Mary ButcherServant18Condover Salop

William Lewis16Apprentice to Shoe TradeOswestry Salop

More About ELIZABETH MUCKLESTON:

Baptism: 28 Apr 1830, St Alkmund's Shrewsbury, Shropshire

Occupation: 1871, Lodging House Keeper in London - Widow

More About ALFRED REEVES WILD:

Occupation: 1861, Collector to the new River?

Child of ELIZABETH MUCKLESTON and ALFRED WILD is:

153.i.LAURA18 WILD, b. Abt. 1865, Camden Town, London.

137.ROBERT17 MUCKLESTON (JOHN16, JOHN15, EDWARD14, ROWLAND13, EDWARD12, ROWLAND11, EDWARD10, JOHN9, EDWARD8, HUGH7, THOMAS6, WILLIAM5, THOMAS4, WILLIAM3, ROGER2DE MUCCLESTON, HOESKYN1) was born 14 Jun 1836 in ShrewsburyShropshire, and died Bef. 1891.He married ANNIE HILL 1861 in St Georges Southwark London.She was born 31 Mar 1839 in England.

Notes for ROBERT MUCKLESTON:

spouse is either Annie Hill or EstherSheasby1841 census reads:-

HO 107/925/1

High Street, Shrewsbury

John Muckleston30GrocerYes

Mary Muckleston25Yes

Robert Muckleston5Yes

Mary Muckleston3Yes

Margaret Mucklesto3Yes

Fanny Muckleston2Yes

Jessie Muckleston1Yes

Richard Williamson20Grocers shopYes

Samuel Gittins12Male ServantYes

Harriet Weatherby20Female servantYes

Sarah Letters30Female ServantYes

1851 Census

HO107/1992/69/11

11 Wyle Cop, Shrewsbury

John MucklestonMarrHead43Tea DealerShrewsbury

Mary MucklestonMarrWife39Shrewsbury

Robert MucklestonSon14Tea Dealers ApprenticeShrewsbury

Margaret MucklestonDau13ScholarShrewsbury

Fanny MucklestonDau12ScholarShrewsbury

Charlotte MucklestonDau7ScholarShrewsbury

Legh MucklestonDau2Shrewsbury

John MucklestonSon10 mthsShrewsbury

Mary BlowerServant26ServantHanworth, Here.

Mary SalterServant14HousemaidCardington

In 1851 he was a tea dealers apprentice

In 1861 he is on the census as living in Camberwell with mother mary,brother Samuel R, sister caroline, sister fanny ann, father john, brother john

1861 census

23 Attwell Road, Camberwell, London

John Mucklestonhead marr 54 proprietor of houses(all born shrewsbury Shropshire)

Mary Muckleston wife marr 50

Robert Muckleston son unm 24 assistant to wholesale draper

Fanny a Muckleston, dau unm 22 governess

Samuel R Muckleston, son 12 scholar

John Muckleston, son 10

Caroline S Muckleston dau 13

April 15 1880

The Bankruptcy act 1861 In the matter of a deed of assignment dated 31st May 1862 made by Robert Muckleston late of 4 Sydney place Commercial Road in the County of Middlesex Linen draper in favour of his creditors notice is hereby given that such creditors of the said Robert Muckleston who have not yet received their dividend of nine shillings in the pound which was declared on the 28th day of November last can receive the same on or before the 30th day of April instant by applying at the offices of the undersigned – dated this 14th day of April 1880 Herbert Lloyd and Lane 8 Old Jewry London EC Solicitors for the Trustee.

In Canada in 1871. as a traveller. did he marry Annnie Hill and have 3 children including aubrey?

St James, Toronto East, Ontario

Robert MucklestonHead33TravellerEngland(English, C of E)

1881 Canadian Census

Meaford, Grey East, Ontario

Annie MucklestonMarriedHead 38England

William Muckleston13Ontario

Alice Muckleston8Ontario

Nellie Muckleston6Ontario

Alberry Dan Muckleston4Ontario

Austin Muckleston35ClerkEngland

1881 Canadian Census

Winnipeg, Selkirk, Manitoba

(This may have been a boarding house, although the head of household is a Gaoler, there is a mixture of males and females and a mixture of ages, the heads own family is also listed.)

Patrick LawlerMarriedHead50GaolerIreland

Robert Mucklestone40ClerkEngland

More About ROBERT MUCKLESTON:

Baptism: 16 Jul 1836, St Mary Shrewsbury Shropshire

Comment 1: 1871, Traveller in Canada

Occupation: 1851, A Tea dealers Apprentice

Notes for ANNIE HILL:

1881 Canadian Census

Meaford, Grey East, Ontario

Annie MucklestonMarriedHead 38England

William Muckleston13Ontario

Alice Muckleston8Ontario

Nellie Muckleston6Ontario

Alberry Dan Muckleston4Ontario

Austin Muckleston35ClerkEngland

1891 Canadian Census

St Stephens Ward, Toronto City, Ontario (3 June 1891)

Annie MucklestonWidowHead48EnglandEnglandEngland

Willie MucklestonUnmarried Son23PlumberOntarioEnglandEngland

Alice MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 19OntarioEnglandEngland

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 16OntarioEnglandEngland

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son13OntarioEnglandEngland

Hoskyn MucklestonBrother43Clerk in HardwareEnglandEnglandEngland

All C of E.

1901 Canadian Census

Ward 5, Toronto West, Ontario

Annie MucklestonWidowHead62 – 31 Mar 1839England(Anglican)

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son23 – 21 Nov 1877PrinterOntario(Anglican)

Allie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 24 – 31 Jan 1876ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 22 – 31 april 1878ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Annie immigration 1865

1911 Canadian Census

Toronto West Ontario

Annie MucklestoneMarriedHead73 – Mar 1838England(Canadian – Anglican)

Nellie MucklestoneUnmarried Daughter 28 – Apr 1883Sales Lady Department StoreOntario(Canadian – Anglican)

Annie year of immigration recorded as 1860

Children of ROBERT MUCKLESTON and ANNIE HILL are:

i.AUBREY DAN18 MUCKLESTON, b. 21 Nov 1877, Grey Ontario Canada.

Notes for AUBREY DAN MUCKLESTON:

1881 Canadian Census

Meaford, Grey East, Ontario

Annie MucklestonMarriedHead 38England

William Muckleston13Ontario

Alice Muckleston8Ontario

Nellie Muckleston6Ontario

Alberry Dan Muckleston4Ontario

Austin Muckleston35ClerkEngland

1891 Canadian Census

St Stephens Ward, Toronto City, Ontario (3 June 1891)

Annie MucklestonWidowHead48EnglandEnglandEngland

Willie MucklestonUnmarried Son23PlumberOntarioEnglandEngland

Alice MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 19OntarioEnglandEngland

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 16OntarioEnglandEngland

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son13OntarioEnglandEngland

Hoskyn MucklestonBrother43Clerk in HardwareEnglandEnglandEngland

All C of E.

1901 Canadian Census

Ward 5, Toronto West, Ontario

Annie MucklestonWidowHead62 – 31 Mar 1839England(Anglican)

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son23 – 21 Nov 1877PrinterOntario(Anglican)

Allie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 24 – 31 Jan 1876ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 22 – 31 april 1878ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Annie immigration 1865

More About AUBREY DAN MUCKLESTON:

Occupation: 1901, Printer

ii.NELLIE MUCKLESTON, b. 25 Apr 1883, York Ontario Canada.

Notes for NELLIE MUCKLESTON:

1891 Canadian Census

St Stephens Ward, Toronto City, Ontario (3 June 1891)

Annie MucklestonWidowHead48EnglandEnglandEngland

Willie MucklestonUnmarried Son23PlumberOntarioEnglandEngland

Alice MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 19OntarioEnglandEngland

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 16OntarioEnglandEngland

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son13OntarioEnglandEngland

Hoskyn MucklestonBrother43Clerk in HardwareEnglandEnglandEngland

All C of E.

1901 Canadian Census

Ward 5, Toronto West, Ontario

Annie MucklestonWidowHead62 – 31 Mar 1839England(Anglican)

Aubrey MucklestonUnmarried Son23 – 21 Nov 1877PrinterOntario(Anglican)

Allie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 24 – 31 Jan 1876ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Nellie MucklestonUnmarried Daughter 22 – 31 april 1878ClerkOntario(Anglican)

Annie immigration 1865

1911 Canadian Census

Toronto West Ontario

Annie MucklestoneMarriedHead73 – Mar 1838England(Canadian – Anglican)

Nellie MucklestoneUnmarried Daughter 28 – Apr 1883Sales Lady Department StoreOntario(Canadian – Anglican)

Annie year of immigration recorded as 1860

More About NELLIE MUCKLESTON:

Occupation: 1901, Clerk